Tim Phillips

Tim Phillips

Associate Professor

tphillip@uky.edu
Phone (859) 218-0769
Fax (859) 257-7125

325 Plant Science Building,
1405 Veterans Drive, Lexington KY 40546-0312

Professional Profile

Areas of interest:  Tall fescue genetics, wide hybridization in the Festuca-Lolium complex, grass-endophyte interactions, and roses.

Education

  • B.S. Botany, NCSU, 1983
  • M.S. Crop Science/Peanut Breeding, NCSU, 1987
  • Ph.D. Crop Science/Small Grains Breeding, NCSU, 1992

Courses Taught

PLS 103 PLANTS, SOILS, AND PEOPLE: A GLOBAL PERSPECTIVE. (3)
Only a few things are essential to life, and food is one of them. What people eat is about what they need to be healthy, what they want to eat (personal  preference and culture), and what they have available or can afford to eat.  Agriculture plays a vital role in human food security. Many experts feel the  world is facing a food supply crisis. Knowledge and application of the  principles of plant and soil sciences will have a dramatic effect on human  food security, now and into the future, both locally and globally. However,  these issues will also be impacted by future human population growth,  urbanization, consumer preferences, human decisions regarding civic  duties, and climate change. Students successfully completing this course  will leave with an understanding of the need to sustainably expand the  world’s food supply, the basic principles of plant and soil science and their  application to this problem, and their own potential role in determining our ability to meet this challenge. Students may not receive credit for both this  course and PLS 104.

PLS 104 PLANTS, SOILS, AND PEOPLE: A SCIENCE PERSPECTIVE. (3)
An introduction to the looming world food crisis and the scientific basis  governing our ability to sustainably meet it. The course explores the  biological and environmental constraints on food production, the ways that  agricultural science has dealt with these in the past and possible ways for  the future, as well as societal and cultural issues, such as population  growth, human health, education, and food definitions, that also impact food security. Intended for any student interested in these topics. Students may  not receive credit for both this course and PLS 103.

PLS 220 INTRODUCTION TO PLANT IDENTIFICATION. (3)
An introduction to the techniques used for plant identification based on over one hundred plants encountered in everyday life. Lecture, one hour;  laboratory, four hours per week.

PLS 514 GRASS TAXONOMY AND IDENTIFICATION. (3)
Overview of the grass family, concentrating on taxonomic issues and  identification skills for ~200 species (turf, forages, weeds, etc.). Lecture:  two hours; laboratory: two hours per week. Prereq: PLS 220 or permission  from instructor.

Areas of Interest

Plant Breeding and Genetics