Elisa M. DAngelo

Elisa D'Angelo

Associate Professor
Director of Undergraduate Studies

edangelo@uky.edu
Phone (859) 257-8651
Fax (859) 257-3655

Ag. Science Bldg. North
1100 Nicholasville Road (Office:122J)
Lexington KY 40546-0091

AREAS OF INTEREST

Primary research interests are determining chemical, physical, and biological factors that regulate aerobic and anaerobic fate and transport of inorganic and organic contaminants in upland soils, wetlands, and aquatic environments, and characterizing the microbial communities responsible for contaminant transformation processes.

PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE

  • 2005-present, Associate Professor, Plant and Soil Science Department, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY.
  • 1999-2005, Assistant Professor, Plant and Soil Science Department, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY.
  • 1986-1999, Senior Biological Scientist, Department of Soil and Water Science, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL.

RESEARCH TOPICS

"Career: Microbial community dynamics during bioremediation of PCBs in soils", National Science Foundation, 2002 to 2007.

"Arsenic speciation and sub-surface losses in poultry litter-amended soils”, Senate Bill 271, 2006 to 2009

"Changes in livestock antibiotic levels and antibiotic resistant bacteria numbers along topohydrosequences in western Kentucky agroecosystems", USDA, 2005 to 2008.

EDUCATION

  • Ph.D., 1998, Soil and Water Science, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL
  • B.S., 1986, Limnology and Biology, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL

COURSES TAUGHT

PLS 104 PLANTS, SOILS, AND PEOPLE: A SCIENCE PERSPECTIVE. (3)
An introduction to the looming world food crisis and the scientific basis  governing our ability to sustainably meet it. The course explores the  biological and environmental constraints on food production, the ways that  agricultural science has dealt with these in the past and possible ways for  the future, as well as societal and cultural issues, such as population  growth, human health, education, and food definitions, that also impact food  security. Intended for any student interested in these topics. Students  may not receive credit for both this course and PLS 103.